Our Structural Goals and Principles

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Our Structural Goals and Principles

Establishing a new union would necessitate many specific decisions regarding the detailed governance and accountability structures of the new union. Our work in this regard is guided by our overarching general goal: to build an effective, democratic, militant union.

Members of the Proposal Committee agreed that the structure of a new union must aim to embody the following goals and principles:

  • The new union must be democratic, progressive, and active, and committed to the principles and practices of social unionism.
  •  The new union must structure and organize itself to provide excellent service to its members, to organize new members, to fight on behalf of all workers (our members and others), and to campaign for progressive change in all areas of society
  •  The new union’s democracy would be governed by the “rank and file principle,” fostering maximum involvement by rank-and-file members at all levels of the union’s democracy.
  •  The new union’s power will be rooted in strong local unions, and capable, accountable local leadership.
  •  The national character of Québec will be reflected in the structure of the new union.
  •  The new union must be able to make decisions effectively, quickly, and flexibly, responding rapidly and powerfully to issues and situations.
  •  The new union must be able to act in a unified, united, integrated manner – as “one union.”
  •  Leadership in the new union must be collective and accountable, implemented by a leadership team.
  •  The new union must be financially strong, including a strong defence fund, with rigorous audit and financial control.
  •  The new union will be fully committed to equity and inclusion, with strong representation and forums for women, racialized and aboriginal workers, LGBT members, workers with disabilities, young workers, and other equity-seeking segments of our membership, at all levels of the union.
  •  The new union will be supported by the efforts and skills of engaged and committed staff.
  •  The structure of the new union must be open to new members, through many channels: new organizing, mergers with other unions, and possibly new forms of membership (such as individual or associate membership). The Proposal Committee’s future work on structural issues will focus on developing specific governance and structure proposals that reflect and embody these broad principles.